Partnering with patients in their own care

Partnering with patients underpins the delivery of care. Patients are partners in their own health care to the extent that they choose.

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Consumer outcome
I can choose how I partner in my health care.

Intention of this standard

Partnering with patients underpins the delivery of care. Patients are partners in their own health care to the extent that they choose.

Healthcare rights and informed consent

2.02—The healthcare service:

  1. Uses a Charter of Rights consistent with the Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights
  2. Has processes to support the workforce to apply the principles of the Charter of Rights in the planning and delivery of health care
  3. Makes the Charter of Rights easily accessible for patients, carers, families and consumers
  4. Ensures its informed consent processes comply with legislation and best practice

2.03—The healthcare service has processes to identify:

  1. The capacity of a patient to make decisions about their own health care
  2. A substitute decision-maker if a patient does not have the capacity to make decisions for themselves

Shared decisions and planning care

2.04—The healthcare service has processes for healthcare providers to partner with patients and/or their substitute decision-maker to plan, communicate, set and review goals, make decisions and document their preferences about their current and future health care

2.05—The healthcare service supports the workforce to form partnerships with patients, carers and families so that patients can be actively involved in their own health care