Antimicrobial Stewardship in Australian Health Care 2018

This publication is designed to provide clinicians and managers working in all healthcare sectors with the evidence, expert guidance and tools they need to initiate and sustain AMS activities in a diverse range of practice settings – hospitals (public and private, metropolitan and rural), primary care and aged care homes.

Cover of the report showing a number of clinicians in different settings.

Downloads

Antimicrobial Stewardship in Australian Health Care 2018

Cover and acknowledgements

Summary

Chapter 1 - Evidence for antimicrobial stewardship

Chapter 2 - Establishing and sustaining an antimicrobial stewardship program

Chapter 3 - Strategies and tools for antimicrobial stewardship

Chapter 4 - Information technology to support antimicrobial stewardship

Chapter 5 - Antimicrobial stewardship education for clinicians

Chapter 6 - Measuring performance and evaluating antimicrobial stewardship programs

Chapter 7 - Involving consumers in antimicrobial stewardship

Chapter 8 - Role of infectious diseases service in antimicrobial stewardship

Chapter 9 - Role of the clinical microbiology service in antimicrobial stewardship

Chapter 10 - Role of prescribers in antimicrobial stewardship

Chapter 11 - Role of the pharmacist and pharmacy services in antimicrobial stewardship

Chapter 12 - Role of nurses, midwives and infection control practitioners in antimicrobial stewardship

Glossary

Accessibility - We aim to provide documents in an accessible format. If you're having problems using a document with your accessibility tools, please contact us for help.

Copyright - Unless stated otherwise, materials provided are covered by a Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike (BY-NC-ND) 4.0 International License.

Description

This publication describes the roles of those responsible for establishing and implementing AMS programs, as well as how prescribers, pharmacists, infection control practitioners, nurses and midwives can contribute to program success by incorporating AMS principles within their clinical practice. It summarises current evidence about AMS strategies and interventions, and their implementation, and each chapter begins with a summary of the key points relevant to the topic:

  • Chapters 1–7 provide strategies for implementing and sustaining AMS. These chapters include guidance on establishing and sustaining AMS programs, strategies and interventions that change prescribing behaviour, use of electronic clinical decision support systems, clinician education, monitoring of antimicrobial use and evaluation of program outcomes, and strategies for engaging consumers in AMS.
  • Chapters 8–12 examine the roles of the different clinicians in AMS. These chapters focus on the roles and responsibilities that clinicians can have in formal AMS programs, as well as how clinicians can incorporate AMS principles into their clinical practice. Chapters cover infectious diseases physicians; clinical microbiology services; prescribers; pharmacists; and nurses, midwives and infection control practitioners.

The publication will continue to evolve with additional chapters to follow that address AMS in specific settings such as primary care. As new resources become available, they will be added as hyperlinks to the resources section in each chapter or to the appendices.

Publication year
2018
Resource type
Publication, report or update