Skip to main content

Reconciliation Action Plan

The Commission's Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) is a first step towards reconciliation and importantly, improving the safety and quality of health care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia.

Description

The Reflect-type RAP is the first of four stages – Reflect, Innovate, Stretch and Elevate. Each stage supports continuous strengthening of reconciliation commitments in new ways. The Commission's Reflect RAP will increase the capability, resources and events across our organisation for staff to learn, form partnerships and innovate to improve the experience of care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people across Australia.

An image of the Commission's Reconciliation Action Plan featuring Aboriginal artwork by Kylie Hill
Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP)
2023
Other resource

The Commission's Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) is a first step towards reconciliation and importantly, improving the safety and quality of healthcare for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia.


About the RAP artwork

The artwork featured in the Commission's RAP was designed by proud Kalkadoon and Waanyi woman, Kylie Hill. The artwork represents community coming together from all walks of life. Each intricate detail demonstrates how we gather in unity to bring about peace, wisdom and understanding under the guidance of our ancestors who continue to watch over us.

A small thumbnail image of the Commission's RAP artwork

Key artwork elements

The alternating lines and dots in these larger circles are the artist’s representation of DNA. No single line or dot is the same representing the DNA of each individual and the coming together of everyone’s DNA, signifying reconciliation.
The train track type lines represent the policies and protocols in place to provide a safe and quality health care system, while the dots represent the people who formulate and adhere to those policies and protocols.
The bush leaves represent traditional Indigenous medicine, and the gathering of natural bush medicine for healing.
The Boomerangs highlight the meaning ‘always come back’. Just like our healthcare workers will always come back to what they are doing and what’s important.
The pink and purple dots and strokes represent the grass skirts worn by our Torres Strait Islander peoples. The greens and blues across the entire art are also a reflection of our Torres Strait Islander peoples.
The central element of the black person represents the patient. The middle circle within the black person is the heart, and the dots and waves around it is the heart beat, signifying that the patient is central to all doing in our health care system.
The three ovals are Coolamons, that is the pots that Indigenous communities use to place and prepare their bush tucker/medicine, like bay leaves and berries.
The flower represents people sitting around the table. The circle in the centre is the table while the arches are the people on chairs around the table. Everybody is welcome at the table and are coming together to work on reconciliation.
Back to top