Communicating for Safety Resource Portal

The portal has guidance, tools and resources to support the core skills for communicating for safety. It links to, and supports, work undertaken by Australian health service organisations in the areas of clinical communication and can be used as a resource for further learning.

This portal is based on the Framework for Communicating for Safety. It is designed to provide clinicians and health service managers with an easy navigable repository of resources to support clinical communication improvement and implementation of the National Safety and Quality Health Service (NSQHS) Standards (second edition). Communication is a core clinical skill that is essential to the delivery of safe, high-quality care and can be developed and improved with practice, experience, continuous learning, mentorship and support. 

Core skills for Communicating for Safety

Communication guidance about different touchpoints of patient care

Arrives

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Arrives

Communicating effectively when a patient is admitted to hospital is essential to ensure that all the relevant information is obtained to undertake appropriate clinical assessments and risk screening, make accurate diagnoses and establish the patient’s goals of care. Effective communication can prevent adverse events and positively influence patient satisfaction and health outcomes.

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Quick reference guide for the Arrives touchpoint

Receives care

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Receives care

Effective communication is crucial in planning and providing care that is aligned with the patient’s goals of care and health care needs, considers the effect of the patient’s health issues on their life and wellbeing, and is clinically appropriate. When clinicians work in partnership with patients and communicate well with other members of the healthcare team, individualised comprehensive care can be delivered that includes strategies to prevent and manage the risks of harm.

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Transferred

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Transferred

Situations when all or part of a patient’s care is transferred between healthcare providers or locations are high risk, and there is an increased risk of communication errors . Structured and standardised communication processes can reduce communication errors and improve patient safety.

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Critical information

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Critical information

Critical information is information that has a considerable impact on a patient’s health, wellbeing or ongoing care (physical or psychological). Emerging or new critical information can occur outside formal clinical handover, and for timely action to occur, information must be communicated to the right person (that is, a clinician who can make decisions about care) and documented to ensure patient safety.

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Deterioration

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Deterioration

Communication is fundamental to the prompt identification, escalation and management of acute deterioration. Effective teamwork and communication, including documentation, of diagnosis and plans for monitoring of observations and ongoing management is crucial to providing safe, high-quality care to the deteriorating patient.

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Leaves

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Leaves

Effective communication at discharge can reduce the risks associated with medication management, ongoing care and readmission. Enhancing a patient’s knowledge of their condition and treatment can help to ensure a safe transition at the end of a hospital stay.

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In the community

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In the community

Follow-up communication involves taking further action after a patient has undergone hospitalisation or treatment. This can be making contact with a patient, or their support person, or healthcare providers in the community. Follow-up communication promotes continuity of care, reduces the risks to patient safety and can positively influence a patient’s healthcare experience.

Learn more

Arrives

C4S portal - arrives icon

Arrives

Communicating effectively when a patient is admitted to hospital is essential to ensure that all the relevant information is obtained to undertake appropriate clinical assessments and risk screening, make accurate diagnoses and establish the patient’s goals of care. Effective communication can prevent adverse events and positively influence patient satisfaction and health outcomes.

Learn more


Quick reference guide for the Arrives touchpoint

Receives care

Receives care icon

Receives care

Effective communication is crucial in planning and providing care that is aligned with the patient’s goals of care and health care needs, considers the effect of the patient’s health issues on their life and wellbeing, and is clinically appropriate. When clinicians work in partnership with patients and communicate well with other members of the healthcare team, individualised comprehensive care can be delivered that includes strategies to prevent and manage the risks of harm.

Learn more

Transferred

Transferred icon

Transferred

Situations when all or part of a patient’s care is transferred between healthcare providers or locations are high risk, and there is an increased risk of communication errors . Structured and standardised communication processes can reduce communication errors and improve patient safety.

Learn more

Critical information

Critical Information icon

Critical information

Critical information is information that has a considerable impact on a patient’s health, wellbeing or ongoing care (physical or psychological). Emerging or new critical information can occur outside formal clinical handover, and for timely action to occur, information must be communicated to the right person (that is, a clinician who can make decisions about care) and documented to ensure patient safety.

Learn more

Deterioration

Deterioration icon

Deterioration

Communication is fundamental to the prompt identification, escalation and management of acute deterioration. Effective teamwork and communication, including documentation, of diagnosis and plans for monitoring of observations and ongoing management is crucial to providing safe, high-quality care to the deteriorating patient.

Learn more

Leaves

Leaves icon

Leaves

Effective communication at discharge can reduce the risks associated with medication management, ongoing care and readmission. Enhancing a patient’s knowledge of their condition and treatment can help to ensure a safe transition at the end of a hospital stay.

Learn more

In the community

In the community icon

In the community

Follow-up communication involves taking further action after a patient has undergone hospitalisation or treatment. This can be making contact with a patient, or their support person, or healthcare providers in the community. Follow-up communication promotes continuity of care, reduces the risks to patient safety and can positively influence a patient’s healthcare experience.

Learn more

Quick reference guide to Resources

Clinical communication and the NSQHS Standards