Infection prevention and control resources for consumers

The Commission has developed a series of fact sheets for consumers and carers about infection prevention and control, and common and emerging healthcare-associated infections.

Hand hygiene

Hand hygiene is the easiest and single most important thing you can do to help stop the spread of germs that cause infections. A series of fact sheets have been developed to provide patients and their carers with information on hand hygiene.

Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE)

Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacterales (CPE) are bacteria that are resistant to carbapenem antibiotics. This means that these antibiotics are not effective in treating infections caused by CPE. This fact sheet explains how people get infected with CPE and the screening procedures for CPE.

Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs)

Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are infections that occur as a result of visiting, or receiving treatment in a healthcare facility. This fact sheet provides information about how HAIs are spread and what you can do to prevent the spread of HAIs.

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacteria that lives on the skin or in the nose. In most cases the bacteria does not cause any harm. However, MRSA can occasionally cause serious health problems if it infects certain parts of the body. This fact sheet provides information for patients and their carers about MRSA, who is at risk of getting MRSA, and how to prevent the spread of MRSA to others.

Clostridioides difficile infections (CDI)

Clostridioides difficile is a bacteria that naturally lives in the human gut. An infection with this bacteria occurs when normal gut bacteria have been changed by antibiotic treatment or by other medications. CDI can cause illness, such as diarrhoea and severe inflammation of the bowel. This fact sheet provides information for patients and their carers about CDI, who is at risk of getting CDI, how CDI is treated and how to prevent the spread of CDI.

Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE)

Enterococci are bacteria that live in your gut and urinary system. This bacteria is found in most people and usually do not cause illness. However enterococci sometimes develops ways that reduce the effectiveness of an antibiotic called vancomyin. Enterococci that can do this are called ‘vancomycin-resistant enterococci’ (VRE). This fact sheet provides information for patients and their carers about VRE, who is at risk of getting VRE and how to prevent the spread of VRE to others.