Action 1.31 states

The health service organisation facilitates access to services and facilities by using signage and directions that are clear and fit for purpose

Intent

Patients, carers and visitors can locate relevant facilities and services.
 

Reflective question

How do patients and visitors find the facilities to gain access to care?

Key task

Review the signage and directions provided throughout the facility.
 

Strategies for improvement

Hospitals

Consider how to direct patients to get to the health service, find their way around the campus, and find the right unit or service within a building. When designing the wayfinding system, consider1:

  • The physical environment, including layout, lighting, landmarks, and changes to interior finishes and colours
  • How to provide information to patients to prepare for their journey
  • The types of signs, graphics and terminology
  • How to ensure that members of the workforce can provide appropriate directions for patients who need assistance.

Instructions should:

  • Be simple, intuitive, user friendly and accessible
  • Integrate with the requirements of a safe and secure facility
  • Meet the legal requirements for accessibility
  • Be easy to maintain
  • Align with the principles of universal design.

Wayfinding strategies may include hard copies of signs, maps and written directions, or more interactive approaches such as employees or volunteers who help people with directions, interactive information kiosks or smartphone apps.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Policy documents for signage, disability access and inclusion
  • Observation of the use of universal signage to enable wayfinding for people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
  • Audit results that show whether signs are clearly visible to people with disability
  • Location maps that are displayed at entrances and in areas of high visual impact
  • Facility map that is available in multiple languages
  • Observation of the use of volunteers in reception areas to assist consumers with directions.

Day Procedure Services

Consider how to direct patients to the health service, including with information about parking, public transport and other essential services. Also consider the types of signs used, graphics and terminology.1

Instructions should1:

  • Be simple, intuitive, user friendly and accessible
  • Integrate with the requirements of a safe and secure facility
  • Meet the legal requirements for accessibility
  • Be easy to maintain
  • Align with the principles of universal design.

Wayfinding strategies may include hard copies of signs, maps and written directions, or more interactive approaches such as employees or volunteers who help people with directions, interactive information kiosks and smartphone apps.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Policy documents for signage, disability access and inclusion
  • Observation of the use of universal signage to enable wayfinding for people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
  • Audit results that show whether signs are clearly visible to people with disability
  • Location maps that are displayed at entrances and in areas of high visual impact
  • Facility map that is available in multiple languages
  • Observation of the use of volunteers in reception areas to assist consumers with directions.

MPS & Small Hospitals

Consider how to direct patients to the health service, including with information about parking, public transport and other essential services. Also consider the types of signs used, graphics and terminology.

Instructions should1:

  • Be simple, intuitive, user friendly and accessible
  • Integrate with the requirements of a safe and secure facility
  • Meet the legal requirements for accessibility
  • Be easy to maintain
  • Align with the principles of universal design.

Wayfinding strategies may include hard copies of signs, maps and written directions, or more interactive approaches such as employees or volunteers who help people with directions, interactive information kiosks and smartphone apps.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Policy documents for signage, disability access and inclusion
  • Observation of the use of universal signage to enable wayfinding for people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
  • Audit results that show whether signs are clearly visible to people with disability
  • Location maps that are displayed at entrances and in areas of high visual impact
  • Facility map that is available in multiple languages
  • Observation of the use of volunteers in reception areas to assist consumers with directions.

Hospitals

Consider how to direct patients to get to the health service, find their way around the campus, and find the right unit or service within a building. When designing the wayfinding system, consider1:

  • The physical environment, including layout, lighting, landmarks, and changes to interior finishes and colours
  • How to provide information to patients to prepare for their journey
  • The types of signs, graphics and terminology
  • How to ensure that members of the workforce can provide appropriate directions for patients who need assistance.

Instructions should:

  • Be simple, intuitive, user friendly and accessible
  • Integrate with the requirements of a safe and secure facility
  • Meet the legal requirements for accessibility
  • Be easy to maintain
  • Align with the principles of universal design.

Wayfinding strategies may include hard copies of signs, maps and written directions, or more interactive approaches such as employees or volunteers who help people with directions, interactive information kiosks or smartphone apps.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Policy documents for signage, disability access and inclusion
  • Observation of the use of universal signage to enable wayfinding for people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
  • Audit results that show whether signs are clearly visible to people with disability
  • Location maps that are displayed at entrances and in areas of high visual impact
  • Facility map that is available in multiple languages
  • Observation of the use of volunteers in reception areas to assist consumers with directions.

Day Procedure Services

Consider how to direct patients to the health service, including with information about parking, public transport and other essential services. Also consider the types of signs used, graphics and terminology.1

Instructions should1:

  • Be simple, intuitive, user friendly and accessible
  • Integrate with the requirements of a safe and secure facility
  • Meet the legal requirements for accessibility
  • Be easy to maintain
  • Align with the principles of universal design.

Wayfinding strategies may include hard copies of signs, maps and written directions, or more interactive approaches such as employees or volunteers who help people with directions, interactive information kiosks and smartphone apps.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Policy documents for signage, disability access and inclusion
  • Observation of the use of universal signage to enable wayfinding for people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
  • Audit results that show whether signs are clearly visible to people with disability
  • Location maps that are displayed at entrances and in areas of high visual impact
  • Facility map that is available in multiple languages
  • Observation of the use of volunteers in reception areas to assist consumers with directions.

MPS & Small Hospitals

Consider how to direct patients to the health service, including with information about parking, public transport and other essential services. Also consider the types of signs used, graphics and terminology.

Instructions should1:

  • Be simple, intuitive, user friendly and accessible
  • Integrate with the requirements of a safe and secure facility
  • Meet the legal requirements for accessibility
  • Be easy to maintain
  • Align with the principles of universal design.

Wayfinding strategies may include hard copies of signs, maps and written directions, or more interactive approaches such as employees or volunteers who help people with directions, interactive information kiosks and smartphone apps.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Policy documents for signage, disability access and inclusion
  • Observation of the use of universal signage to enable wayfinding for people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
  • Audit results that show whether signs are clearly visible to people with disability
  • Location maps that are displayed at entrances and in areas of high visual impact
  • Facility map that is available in multiple languages
  • Observation of the use of volunteers in reception areas to assist consumers with directions.

Reference

  1. Queensland Health. Queensland Health wayfinding design guidelines. Brisbane: Queensland Health; 2010.