This action states

The health service organisation has processes to apply standard and transmission-based precautions that are consistent with the current edition of the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare, and jurisdictional requirements

Intent

The risk of infection to patients, the workforce and visitors is minimised by the routine application of basic infection prevention and control strategies.

Reflective question

How does the health service organisation ensure that its standard and transmission-based precautions are consistent with the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare, and with state or territory requirements?

Key tasks

  • Use information from risk management systems to identify strategies to reduce the risks of healthcare-associated infections.
  • Review current policies, procedures and protocols to ensure that they align and comply with the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare and jurisdictional requirements.
  • Provide access to the equipment, supplies and products required to comply with standard and transmission-based precautions.
  • Use the results of risk assessment processes to set priorities for assessment of workforce compliance with standard and transmission-based precautions.
  • Include the expectations of the workforce regarding infection prevention and control activities, including application of standard and transmission-based precautions, in the organisation’s workforce orientation program.

Strategies for improvement

Hospitals

Ensure that the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare and relevant state or territory requirements are available and accessible to the workforce when reviewing practice, policy and procedures.

Ensure that policies, procedures and protocols respond to areas in which there is the greatest risk of infection transmission. Work with individuals, services and committees to identify where risks have been identified, and where changes need to occur or improvements can be made to respond to risks.

Ensure that the equipment, supplies and products required by the workforce to work safely and minimise the risk of infection transmission are accessible, located where required and appropriate to the risks identified for that clinical area.

Based on information from the risk management systems, identify and set priorities for when, where and how compliance with standard and transmission-based precautions can be monitored, assessed and reviewed. Activities may include:

  • Auditing hand hygiene
  • Auditing putting on and removal of personal protective equipment
  • Prioritising competency assessment for aseptic technique to members of the workforce who have been identified as high risk
  • Assessing compliance with the requirements of transmission-based precautions when applied to a specific infection risk
  • Reviewing surveillance data on healthcare-associated infections
  • Reviewing incident reports relating to
    • infection prevention and control issues
    • intravascular devices
    • sharps and waste management
    • occupational exposures
    • biological spills and environmental cleaning.

Review or develop workforce education and orientation programs to include key aspects of standard and transmission-based precautions.

Evaluate attendance at, and content of, the orientation or induction programs for the workforce.

Develop or review signage, alert systems, and information/reminder systems and resources to raise awareness of standard and transmission-based precautions, and ensure consistency with the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare.

Have a management plan that can operate during localised outbreaks or periods when infections may be common (for example, seasonal influenza or local outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis) that:

  • Identifies possible cases
  • Implements other treatment options (for example, rescheduling procedures)
  • Advises about exclusion periods for elective procedures
  • Suggests management options for suspected or confirmed infections that may be transmissible
  • Reduces impacts on treatment and recovery
  • Addresses workforce occupational risk.

Day Procedure Services

Ensure that the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare and relevant state or territory requirements are available and accessible to the workforce when reviewing practice, policy and procedures.

Ensure that policies, procedures and protocols respond to areas in which there is the greatest risk of infection transmission. Work with individuals, services and committees to identify where risks have been identified, and where changes need to occur or improvements can be made to respond to risks.

Ensure that the equipment, supplies and products required by the workforce to work safely and minimise the risk of infection transmission are accessible, located where required and appropriate to the risks identified for that clinical area.

Based on information from the risk management systems, identify and set priorities for when, where and how compliance with standard and transmission-based precautions can be monitored, assessed and reviewed. Activities may include:

  • Auditing hand hygiene
  • Auditing putting on and removal of personal protective equipment
  • Prioritising competency assessment for aseptic technique to members of the workforce who have been identified as high risk
  • Assessing compliance with the requirements of transmission-based precautions when applied to a specific infection risk
  • Reviewing surveillance data on healthcare-associated infections
  • Reviewing incident reports relating to
    • infection prevention and control issues
    • intravascular devices
    • sharps and waste management
    • occupational exposures
    • environmental cleaning and biological spills.

Review or develop workforce education and orientation programs to include key aspects of standard and transmission-based precautions. Evaluate attendance at, and content of, the orientation or induction programs for the workforce.

Develop or review signage, alert systems, and information/reminder systems and resources to raise awareness of standard and transmission-based precautions, and ensure consistency with the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare.

Have a management plan that can operate during localised outbreaks or periods when infections may be common (for example, seasonal influenza or local outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis) that:

  • Identifies possible cases
  • Implements other treatment options (for example, rescheduling procedures)
  • Advises about exclusion periods for elective procedures
  • Suggests management options for suspected or confirmed infections that may be transmissible
  • Reduces impacts on treatment and recovery
  • Addresses workforce occupational risk.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Policy documents about standard and transmission-based precautions that are consistent with the current edition of the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare and are available to the workforce
  • Audit results of workforce compliance with standard and transmission-based precautions
  • Training documents about standard and transmission-based precautions
  • Examples of improvement activities that have been implemented and evaluated to improve compliance with, and raise awareness of, standard and transmission-based precautions
  • Committee and meeting records in which compliance with, and incidents relating to, standard and transmission-based precautions were discussed
  • Observation of standardised signage and other information resources consistent with the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare.

MPS & Small Hospitals

MPSs or small hospitals that are part of a local health network or private hospital group should adopt or adapt and use the established standard and transmission-based precautions systems.

Small hospitals that are not part of a local health network or private hospital group should:

  • Use information from risk management systems to identify strategies to reduce the risks of healthcare-associated infections
  • Review current policies, procedures and protocols to ensure that they align and comply with the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare and state or territory requirements
  • Provide access to the equipment, supplies and products required to comply with standard and transmission-based precautions
  • Use the results of risk assessment processes to set priorities for assessment of workforce compliance with standard and transmission-based precautions
  • Include the expectations of the workforce regarding infection prevention and control activities, including application of standard and transmission-based precautions, in the organisation’s workforce orientation program.

Ensure that the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare and relevant state or territory requirements are available and accessible to the workforce when reviewing practice, policy and procedures.

Based on information from the risk management systems, identify and set priorities for when, where and how compliance with standard and transmission-based precautions can be monitored, assessed and reviewed. Activities may include:

  • Auditing hand hygiene
  • Auditing putting on and removal of personal protective equipment
  • Prioritising competency assessment for aseptic technique to members of the workforce who have been identified as high risk
  • Assessing compliance with the requirements of transmission-based precautions when applied to a specific infection risk
  • Reviewing surveillance data on healthcare-associated infections
  • Reviewing incident reports relating to
    • infection prevention and control issues
    • intravascular devices
    • sharps and waste management
    • occupational exposures
    • environmental cleaning and biological spills.

Develop or review signage, alert systems, and information/reminder systems and resources to raise awareness of standard and transmission-based precautions, and ensure consistency with the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare.

Have a management plan that can operate during localised outbreaks or periods when infections may be common (for example, seasonal influenza or local outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis) that:

  • Identifies possible cases
  • Implements other treatment options (for example, rescheduling procedures)
  • Advises on exclusion periods for elective procedures
  • Suggests management options for suspected or confirmed infections that may be transmissible
  • Reduces effect on treatment and recovery
  • Addresses workforce occupational risk.

Hospitals

Ensure that the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare and relevant state or territory requirements are available and accessible to the workforce when reviewing practice, policy and procedures.

Ensure that policies, procedures and protocols respond to areas in which there is the greatest risk of infection transmission. Work with individuals, services and committees to identify where risks have been identified, and where changes need to occur or improvements can be made to respond to risks.

Ensure that the equipment, supplies and products required by the workforce to work safely and minimise the risk of infection transmission are accessible, located where required and appropriate to the risks identified for that clinical area.

Based on information from the risk management systems, identify and set priorities for when, where and how compliance with standard and transmission-based precautions can be monitored, assessed and reviewed. Activities may include:

  • Auditing hand hygiene
  • Auditing putting on and removal of personal protective equipment
  • Prioritising competency assessment for aseptic technique to members of the workforce who have been identified as high risk
  • Assessing compliance with the requirements of transmission-based precautions when applied to a specific infection risk
  • Reviewing surveillance data on healthcare-associated infections
  • Reviewing incident reports relating to
    • infection prevention and control issues
    • intravascular devices
    • sharps and waste management
    • occupational exposures
    • biological spills and environmental cleaning.

Review or develop workforce education and orientation programs to include key aspects of standard and transmission-based precautions.

Evaluate attendance at, and content of, the orientation or induction programs for the workforce.

Develop or review signage, alert systems, and information/reminder systems and resources to raise awareness of standard and transmission-based precautions, and ensure consistency with the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare.

Have a management plan that can operate during localised outbreaks or periods when infections may be common (for example, seasonal influenza or local outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis) that:

  • Identifies possible cases
  • Implements other treatment options (for example, rescheduling procedures)
  • Advises about exclusion periods for elective procedures
  • Suggests management options for suspected or confirmed infections that may be transmissible
  • Reduces impacts on treatment and recovery
  • Addresses workforce occupational risk.

Day Procedure Services

Ensure that the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare and relevant state or territory requirements are available and accessible to the workforce when reviewing practice, policy and procedures.

Ensure that policies, procedures and protocols respond to areas in which there is the greatest risk of infection transmission. Work with individuals, services and committees to identify where risks have been identified, and where changes need to occur or improvements can be made to respond to risks.

Ensure that the equipment, supplies and products required by the workforce to work safely and minimise the risk of infection transmission are accessible, located where required and appropriate to the risks identified for that clinical area.

Based on information from the risk management systems, identify and set priorities for when, where and how compliance with standard and transmission-based precautions can be monitored, assessed and reviewed. Activities may include:

  • Auditing hand hygiene
  • Auditing putting on and removal of personal protective equipment
  • Prioritising competency assessment for aseptic technique to members of the workforce who have been identified as high risk
  • Assessing compliance with the requirements of transmission-based precautions when applied to a specific infection risk
  • Reviewing surveillance data on healthcare-associated infections
  • Reviewing incident reports relating to
    • infection prevention and control issues
    • intravascular devices
    • sharps and waste management
    • occupational exposures
    • environmental cleaning and biological spills.

Review or develop workforce education and orientation programs to include key aspects of standard and transmission-based precautions. Evaluate attendance at, and content of, the orientation or induction programs for the workforce.

Develop or review signage, alert systems, and information/reminder systems and resources to raise awareness of standard and transmission-based precautions, and ensure consistency with the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare.

Have a management plan that can operate during localised outbreaks or periods when infections may be common (for example, seasonal influenza or local outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis) that:

  • Identifies possible cases
  • Implements other treatment options (for example, rescheduling procedures)
  • Advises about exclusion periods for elective procedures
  • Suggests management options for suspected or confirmed infections that may be transmissible
  • Reduces impacts on treatment and recovery
  • Addresses workforce occupational risk.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Policy documents about standard and transmission-based precautions that are consistent with the current edition of the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare and are available to the workforce
  • Audit results of workforce compliance with standard and transmission-based precautions
  • Training documents about standard and transmission-based precautions
  • Examples of improvement activities that have been implemented and evaluated to improve compliance with, and raise awareness of, standard and transmission-based precautions
  • Committee and meeting records in which compliance with, and incidents relating to, standard and transmission-based precautions were discussed
  • Observation of standardised signage and other information resources consistent with the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare.

MPS & Small Hospitals

MPSs or small hospitals that are part of a local health network or private hospital group should adopt or adapt and use the established standard and transmission-based precautions systems.

Small hospitals that are not part of a local health network or private hospital group should:

  • Use information from risk management systems to identify strategies to reduce the risks of healthcare-associated infections
  • Review current policies, procedures and protocols to ensure that they align and comply with the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare and state or territory requirements
  • Provide access to the equipment, supplies and products required to comply with standard and transmission-based precautions
  • Use the results of risk assessment processes to set priorities for assessment of workforce compliance with standard and transmission-based precautions
  • Include the expectations of the workforce regarding infection prevention and control activities, including application of standard and transmission-based precautions, in the organisation’s workforce orientation program.

Ensure that the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare and relevant state or territory requirements are available and accessible to the workforce when reviewing practice, policy and procedures.

Based on information from the risk management systems, identify and set priorities for when, where and how compliance with standard and transmission-based precautions can be monitored, assessed and reviewed. Activities may include:

  • Auditing hand hygiene
  • Auditing putting on and removal of personal protective equipment
  • Prioritising competency assessment for aseptic technique to members of the workforce who have been identified as high risk
  • Assessing compliance with the requirements of transmission-based precautions when applied to a specific infection risk
  • Reviewing surveillance data on healthcare-associated infections
  • Reviewing incident reports relating to
    • infection prevention and control issues
    • intravascular devices
    • sharps and waste management
    • occupational exposures
    • environmental cleaning and biological spills.

Develop or review signage, alert systems, and information/reminder systems and resources to raise awareness of standard and transmission-based precautions, and ensure consistency with the Australian Guidelines for the Prevention and Control of Infection in Healthcare.

Have a management plan that can operate during localised outbreaks or periods when infections may be common (for example, seasonal influenza or local outbreaks of viral gastroenteritis) that:

  • Identifies possible cases
  • Implements other treatment options (for example, rescheduling procedures)
  • Advises on exclusion periods for elective procedures
  • Suggests management options for suspected or confirmed infections that may be transmissible
  • Reduces effect on treatment and recovery
  • Addresses workforce occupational risk.