Action 1.26 states

The health service organisation provides supervision for clinicians to ensure that they can safely fulfil their designated roles, including access to after-hours advice, where appropriate

Intent

The clinical workforce is appropriately supervised as and when required to ensure the provision of safe, high-quality care.

Reflective question

How does the health service organisation monitor and support clinicians to safely fulfil their designated roles?

Key task

  • Identify clinicians who require supervision, including junior clinicians, clinicians in training, clinicians who are expanding their scope of clinical practice and clinicians who require oversight of their performance.

Strategies for improvement

Hospitals

Effective clinical supervision enables health professionals to practise effectively and enhances patient safety.

Supervision is a key safeguard for safe and high-quality care. Supervision of junior clinicians should be appropriate to their assessed capabilities, and be consistent with organisational policies, procedures and protocols. A key goal of supervision is to safely develop a clinician’s capabilities.

Formally document the roles and responsibilities of clinicians who are in training in their position description and training program. Monitor compliance with training requirements as part of the clinician’s training program and performance reviews.1

As trainees gain experience, they achieve greater independence. Some organisations approve trainees undertaking increasingly higher levels of performance. In such circumstances, define and regularly review the trainee’s scope of clinical practice as part of their training program to assess competence.1

Define who is responsible for monitoring trainees’ performance and confirming they operate within their scope of clinical practice or training portfolio requirements. Ensure that this information is readily available to other clinicians working with the trainee. Provide regular feedback to trainees on their performance.

Clearly define clinical supervision responsibilities in the contracts of employment or engagement of all senior clinicians, and in relevant organisational policies, including those that apply to the performance development system. This will help to ensure that junior clinicians develop their skills, while protecting the safety and quality of patient care.

Ensure that clinicians who supervise other clinicians1:

  • Have the qualifications and skills necessary to 
    supervise in the nominated area of clinical practice
  • Have experience at the appropriate level of practice
  • Have the training and experience necessary to provide supervision
  • Are located appropriately to provide adequate supervision
  • Participate in the process of reviewing the supervised clinicians’ scope of clinical practice.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Individual performance reviews for the clinical workforce, including requirements for supervision
  • Audit of the extent and effectiveness of supervision
  • Observation of clinical practice
  • Mentoring or peer-review reports
  • Audit results of members of the clinical workforce who have completed performance reviews, including supervision that is required, and actions taken to deal with identified training and development needs.

Day Procedure Services

Supervision is a key safeguard for safe and high-quality care. Supervision of junior clinicians should be appropriate to their assessed capabilities, and be consistent with organisational policies, procedures and protocols. A key goal of supervision is to safely develop a clinician’s capabilities.

Formally document the roles and responsibilities of clinicians who are in training in their position description and training program. Monitor compliance with training requirements as part of the clinician’s training program and performance reviews.1

Clearly define clinical supervision responsibilities in the contracts of employment or engagement of all senior clinicians, and in relevant organisational policies, including those that apply to the performance development system. This will help to ensure that junior clinicians develop their skills, while protecting the safety and quality of patient care.

Ensure that clinicians who supervise other clinicians1:

  • Have the qualifications and skills necessary to supervise in the nominated area of clinical practice
  • Have experience at the appropriate level of practice
  • Have the training and experience necessary to provide supervision
  • Are located appropriately to provide adequate supervision
  • Participate in the process of reviewing the supervised clinicians’ scope of clinical practice.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Individual performance reviews for the clinical workforce, including requirements for supervision
  • Audit of the extent and effectiveness of supervision
  • Observation of clinical practice
  • Mentoring or peer-review reports
  • Audit results of members of the clinical workforce who have completed performance reviews, including supervision that is required, and actions taken to deal with identified training and development needs.

MPS & Small Hospitals

Supervision is a key safeguard for safe and high-quality care. Supervision of junior clinicians should be appropriate to their assessed capabilities, and be consistent with organisational policies, procedures and protocols. A key goal of supervision is to safely develop a clinician’s capabilities.

MPSs and small hospitals will need to identify clinicians who need supervision, including junior clinicians, clinicians in training, clinicians who are expanding their scope of clinical practice and clinicians who need oversight of their performance.

Formally document the roles and responsibilities of clinicians being supervised and define the supervising clinicians responsibilities for monitoring performance.

Ensure that clinicians who supervise other clinicians1:

  • Have the qualifications and skills necessary to supervise in the nominated area of clinical practice
  • Have experience at the appropriate level of practice
  • Have the training and experience necessary to provide supervision
  • Are located appropriately to provide adequate supervision
  • Participate in the process of reviewing the supervised clinicians’ scope of clinical practice.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Individual performance reviews for the clinical workforce, including requirements for supervision
  • Audit of the extent and effectiveness of supervision
  • Observation of clinical practice
  • Mentoring or peer-review reports
  • Audit results of members of the clinical workforce who have completed performance reviews, including supervision that is required, and actions taken to deal with identified training and development needs.

Hospitals

Effective clinical supervision enables health professionals to practise effectively and enhances patient safety.

Supervision is a key safeguard for safe and high-quality care. Supervision of junior clinicians should be appropriate to their assessed capabilities, and be consistent with organisational policies, procedures and protocols. A key goal of supervision is to safely develop a clinician’s capabilities.

Formally document the roles and responsibilities of clinicians who are in training in their position description and training program. Monitor compliance with training requirements as part of the clinician’s training program and performance reviews.1

As trainees gain experience, they achieve greater independence. Some organisations approve trainees undertaking increasingly higher levels of performance. In such circumstances, define and regularly review the trainee’s scope of clinical practice as part of their training program to assess competence.1

Define who is responsible for monitoring trainees’ performance and confirming they operate within their scope of clinical practice or training portfolio requirements. Ensure that this information is readily available to other clinicians working with the trainee. Provide regular feedback to trainees on their performance.

Clearly define clinical supervision responsibilities in the contracts of employment or engagement of all senior clinicians, and in relevant organisational policies, including those that apply to the performance development system. This will help to ensure that junior clinicians develop their skills, while protecting the safety and quality of patient care.

Ensure that clinicians who supervise other clinicians1:

  • Have the qualifications and skills necessary to 
    supervise in the nominated area of clinical practice
  • Have experience at the appropriate level of practice
  • Have the training and experience necessary to provide supervision
  • Are located appropriately to provide adequate supervision
  • Participate in the process of reviewing the supervised clinicians’ scope of clinical practice.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Individual performance reviews for the clinical workforce, including requirements for supervision
  • Audit of the extent and effectiveness of supervision
  • Observation of clinical practice
  • Mentoring or peer-review reports
  • Audit results of members of the clinical workforce who have completed performance reviews, including supervision that is required, and actions taken to deal with identified training and development needs.

Day Procedure Services

Supervision is a key safeguard for safe and high-quality care. Supervision of junior clinicians should be appropriate to their assessed capabilities, and be consistent with organisational policies, procedures and protocols. A key goal of supervision is to safely develop a clinician’s capabilities.

Formally document the roles and responsibilities of clinicians who are in training in their position description and training program. Monitor compliance with training requirements as part of the clinician’s training program and performance reviews.1

Clearly define clinical supervision responsibilities in the contracts of employment or engagement of all senior clinicians, and in relevant organisational policies, including those that apply to the performance development system. This will help to ensure that junior clinicians develop their skills, while protecting the safety and quality of patient care.

Ensure that clinicians who supervise other clinicians1:

  • Have the qualifications and skills necessary to supervise in the nominated area of clinical practice
  • Have experience at the appropriate level of practice
  • Have the training and experience necessary to provide supervision
  • Are located appropriately to provide adequate supervision
  • Participate in the process of reviewing the supervised clinicians’ scope of clinical practice.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Individual performance reviews for the clinical workforce, including requirements for supervision
  • Audit of the extent and effectiveness of supervision
  • Observation of clinical practice
  • Mentoring or peer-review reports
  • Audit results of members of the clinical workforce who have completed performance reviews, including supervision that is required, and actions taken to deal with identified training and development needs.

MPS & Small Hospitals

Supervision is a key safeguard for safe and high-quality care. Supervision of junior clinicians should be appropriate to their assessed capabilities, and be consistent with organisational policies, procedures and protocols. A key goal of supervision is to safely develop a clinician’s capabilities.

MPSs and small hospitals will need to identify clinicians who need supervision, including junior clinicians, clinicians in training, clinicians who are expanding their scope of clinical practice and clinicians who need oversight of their performance.

Formally document the roles and responsibilities of clinicians being supervised and define the supervising clinicians responsibilities for monitoring performance.

Ensure that clinicians who supervise other clinicians1:

  • Have the qualifications and skills necessary to supervise in the nominated area of clinical practice
  • Have experience at the appropriate level of practice
  • Have the training and experience necessary to provide supervision
  • Are located appropriately to provide adequate supervision
  • Participate in the process of reviewing the supervised clinicians’ scope of clinical practice.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Individual performance reviews for the clinical workforce, including requirements for supervision
  • Audit of the extent and effectiveness of supervision
  • Observation of clinical practice
  • Mentoring or peer-review reports
  • Audit results of members of the clinical workforce who have completed performance reviews, including supervision that is required, and actions taken to deal with identified training and development needs.

Reference

  1. Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care. Credentialing health practitioners and defining their scope of clinical practice: a guide for managers and practitioners. Sydney: ACSQHC; 2015.