This action states

Clinicians support patients, carers and families to make shared decisions about end-of-life care in accordance with the National Consensus Statement: Essential elements for safe and high-quality end-of-life care

Intent

Clinicians support consumers, carers and families to make shared decisions about end-of-life care.

Reflective questions

How are clinicians supported to share decisions about end-of-life care with patients, carers and families?

How are clinicians supported to deliver care that aligns with the National Consensus Statement: Essential elements for safe and high-quality end-of-life care?

Key task

Provide guidance for clinicians about using processes for shared decision making in the context of end-of-life care.

Strategies for improvement

Hospitals

The consensus statement sets out suggested practice for health service organisations delivering end-of-life care in settings that provide acute health care. It describes 10 essential elements of care.

Use the actions described in the first essential element of the consensus statement and in the Partnering with Consumers Standard to guide the development of processes to support clinicians to work collaboratively with patients, carers and families, and make shared decisions about end-of-life care.

The patient and the clinical team are essential participants in discussions and decision-making about care at the end of life. Include substitute decision-makers, carers and families according to the patient’s wishes and state or territory legislative frameworks. More information about advance care planning in each state and territory is available from the Advance Care Planning Australian website.

Having conversations about death, dying and the end of life requires compassion, knowledge, experience, sensitivity and skill on the part of the clinicians involved. Provide orientation, education and training for clinicians to understand their individual roles, responsibilities and accountabilities in working with patients, carers and families to make shared decisions about end-of-life care. This may include developing peer support and mentoring programs to help clinicians practise and improve their skills over time. Training, education and mentoring programs should be consistent with the actions described in the consensus statement, and may need to cover several processes and skills, such as:

  • Using organisational shared decision-making processes
  • Supporting shared decision making in patients with fluctuating capacity
  • Strengthening communication skills and preparing for discussions about end-of-life care
  • Developing cultural competence
  • Providing information about organ and tissue donation
  • Documenting the outcome of shared decision-making processes.

Many states and territories have strategies and resources in place to support efforts to improve end-of-life care. Refer to these when planning improvements within the health service organisation.

Day Procedure Services

This action will not be applicable for most day procedure services. It is unlikely that day procedure services will be providing care to patients at the end of life because of the nature of the service and pre-admission screening.

Refer to the hospitals tab for detailed implementation strategies and examples of evidence for this action.

MPS & Small Hospitals

The consensus statement sets out suggested practice for health service organisations delivering end-of-life care in settings that provide acute health care. It describes 10 essential elements of care.

Use the actions described in the first essential element of the consensus statement and in the Partnering with Consumers Standard to guide the development of processes to support clinicians to work collaboratively with patients, carers and families, and make shared decisions about end-of-life care.

The patient and the clinical team are essential participants in discussions and decision-making about care at the end of life. Include substitute decision-makers, carers and families according to the patient’s wishes and state or territory legislative frameworks. More information about advance care planning in each state and territory is available from the Advance Care Planning Australian website.

Having conversations about death, dying and the end of life requires compassion, knowledge, experience, sensitivity and skill on the part of the clinicians involved. Provide orientation, education and training for clinicians to understand their individual roles, responsibilities and accountabilities in working with patients, carers and families to make shared decisions about end-of-life care. This may include developing peer support and mentoring programs to help clinicians practise and improve their skills over time. Training, education and mentoring programs should be consistent with the actions described in the consensus statement, and may need to cover several processes and skills, such as:

  • Using organisational shared decision-making processes
  • Supporting shared decision making in patients with fluctuating capacity
  • Strengthening communication skills and preparing for discussions about end-of-life care
  • Developing cultural competence
  • Providing information about organ and tissue donation
  • Documenting the outcome of shared decision-making processes.

Many states and territories have strategies and resources in place to support efforts to improve end-of-life care. Refer to these when planning improvements within the health service organisation.

Hospitals

The consensus statement sets out suggested practice for health service organisations delivering end-of-life care in settings that provide acute health care. It describes 10 essential elements of care.

Use the actions described in the first essential element of the consensus statement and in the Partnering with Consumers Standard to guide the development of processes to support clinicians to work collaboratively with patients, carers and families, and make shared decisions about end-of-life care.

The patient and the clinical team are essential participants in discussions and decision-making about care at the end of life. Include substitute decision-makers, carers and families according to the patient’s wishes and state or territory legislative frameworks. More information about advance care planning in each state and territory is available from the Advance Care Planning Australian website.

Having conversations about death, dying and the end of life requires compassion, knowledge, experience, sensitivity and skill on the part of the clinicians involved. Provide orientation, education and training for clinicians to understand their individual roles, responsibilities and accountabilities in working with patients, carers and families to make shared decisions about end-of-life care. This may include developing peer support and mentoring programs to help clinicians practise and improve their skills over time. Training, education and mentoring programs should be consistent with the actions described in the consensus statement, and may need to cover several processes and skills, such as:

  • Using organisational shared decision-making processes
  • Supporting shared decision making in patients with fluctuating capacity
  • Strengthening communication skills and preparing for discussions about end-of-life care
  • Developing cultural competence
  • Providing information about organ and tissue donation
  • Documenting the outcome of shared decision-making processes.

Many states and territories have strategies and resources in place to support efforts to improve end-of-life care. Refer to these when planning improvements within the health service organisation.

Day Procedure Services

This action will not be applicable for most day procedure services. It is unlikely that day procedure services will be providing care to patients at the end of life because of the nature of the service and pre-admission screening.

Refer to the hospitals tab for detailed implementation strategies and examples of evidence for this action.

MPS & Small Hospitals

The consensus statement sets out suggested practice for health service organisations delivering end-of-life care in settings that provide acute health care. It describes 10 essential elements of care.

Use the actions described in the first essential element of the consensus statement and in the Partnering with Consumers Standard to guide the development of processes to support clinicians to work collaboratively with patients, carers and families, and make shared decisions about end-of-life care.

The patient and the clinical team are essential participants in discussions and decision-making about care at the end of life. Include substitute decision-makers, carers and families according to the patient’s wishes and state or territory legislative frameworks. More information about advance care planning in each state and territory is available from the Advance Care Planning Australian website.

Having conversations about death, dying and the end of life requires compassion, knowledge, experience, sensitivity and skill on the part of the clinicians involved. Provide orientation, education and training for clinicians to understand their individual roles, responsibilities and accountabilities in working with patients, carers and families to make shared decisions about end-of-life care. This may include developing peer support and mentoring programs to help clinicians practise and improve their skills over time. Training, education and mentoring programs should be consistent with the actions described in the consensus statement, and may need to cover several processes and skills, such as:

  • Using organisational shared decision-making processes
  • Supporting shared decision making in patients with fluctuating capacity
  • Strengthening communication skills and preparing for discussions about end-of-life care
  • Developing cultural competence
  • Providing information about organ and tissue donation
  • Documenting the outcome of shared decision-making processes.

Many states and territories have strategies and resources in place to support efforts to improve end-of-life care. Refer to these when planning improvements within the health service organisation.