Action 2.12 states

The health service organisation provides orientation, support and education to consumers who are partnering in the governance, design, measurement and evaluation of the organisation

Intent

Consumers partnering in organisational design and governance have the skills and knowledge they need to be able to contribute effectively.

Reflective questions

What training and support are offered to consumers who are partnering in the governance, design, measurement and evaluation of the health service organisation?

How is feedback from consumers used to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of the support provided?

Key task

Develop (or adapt), and provide access to, orientation training and resources for consumers who take part in governance processes, or contribute to design, measurement or evaluation activities.

Strategies for improvement

Hospitals

Provide training and support for consumers involved in the organisation’s governance process, and those who take part in design, measurement or evaluation activities. This gives these consumers the best opportunity to contribute meaningfully and effectively to the organisation. Training can be provided face to face, through take-home resources or through online portals, and may include1:

  • Orientation to the health service organisation
  • Orientation to health service decision-making processes for consumers
  • Meeting procedures
  • Communication skills.

Review existing processes for orienting consumers who have taken on a partnership role in organisational design and governance

This may involve identifying and reviewing the relevance, accessibility and applicability of induction processes and materials for consumers involved in organisational design and governance, including:

  • Written information and resources on relevant subjects, required skills, roles and responsibilities
  • Training and education
  • Ongoing support.

Develop and facilitate access to orientation, training and resources

Develop and/or facilitate access to comprehensive orientation, training and resources for consumers partnering with the organisation.

Strategies may include:

Determine which consumers will gain the most benefit from participating in orientation and training. Training may be more applicable for consumers who are involved in formal partnerships with the organisation, such as members of boards or committees. It may not be feasible or appropriate to provide training for consumers who are involved in more informal partnerships, such as waiting room discussions or consultation processes.

Consider the needs of consumers involved in informal partnerships and ensure that they:

  • Are aware that the information they provide is separate to the process of providing or receiving care, and will not affect their treatment
  • Understand the process in which they are participating and how the information they provide will be used
  • Have an opportunity to provide further comment later if they wish
  • Have an opportunity to raise concerns about the process if they wish.

When looking for ways to support and train consumers and carers, look at similar organisations, speak to state-based consumer healthcare organisations, and think about how existing orientation training and resources could be adapted for consumers and carers.

Day Procedure Services

Provide training and support for consumers involved in the organisation’s governance process, and those who take part in design, measurement or evaluation activities. This gives these consumers the best opportunity to contribute meaningfully and effectively to the organisation. Training can be provided face to face, through take-home resources or through online portals.

Day procedure services may not have the capacity to develop comprehensive training and resources. Instead, look to adapt resources from similar organisations or arrange access to external training programs for consumers partnering with the organisation. Many consumer organisations provide consumer representative training. In addition, the Health Issues Centre has developed Australia’s only accredited consumer representative training course.

Other strategies for orientating and training consumers may include:

  • Providing a tour of the facility, introducing the consumer to key members of the workforce, and explaining the consumer’s role and expectations of their involvement
  • Having a key member of the workforce meet with the consumer regularly to touch base and identify any information required or skills that the consumer would like to develop as part of their role.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Policy documents that describe the orientation and ongoing training provided to consumers who have formed partnerships with the health service organisation
  • Calendar of internal and external training that is available to support consumers who take part in the governance, design, measurement and evaluation of the health service organisation
  • Feedback from consumers and consumer representatives on their experience of orientation, support and education for involvement in governance, design, measurement and evaluation.

MPS & Small Hospitals

MPSs or small hospitals that are part of a local health network or private hospital group should adopt or adapt and use the established orientation program for consumers who partner with their organisation.

Small hospitals that are not part of a local health network or private hospital group should develop training and support for consumers who are involved in the organisation’s governance process, and consumers who take part in design, measurement or evaluation activities, by:

  • Adapting written resources from similar organisations
  • Facilitating access to external training programs for consumers who are partnering with the organisation, such as consumer representative training (see Australia’s only accredited consumer representative training course, developed by the Health Issues Centre)
  • Providing a tour of the facility, introducing the consumer to key members of the workforce, and explaining the consumer’s role and expectations
  • Having a key workforce member meet with the consumer regularly to identify any information required or skills that the consumer would like to develop as part of their role.

Hospitals

Provide training and support for consumers involved in the organisation’s governance process, and those who take part in design, measurement or evaluation activities. This gives these consumers the best opportunity to contribute meaningfully and effectively to the organisation. Training can be provided face to face, through take-home resources or through online portals, and may include1:

  • Orientation to the health service organisation
  • Orientation to health service decision-making processes for consumers
  • Meeting procedures
  • Communication skills.

Review existing processes for orienting consumers who have taken on a partnership role in organisational design and governance

This may involve identifying and reviewing the relevance, accessibility and applicability of induction processes and materials for consumers involved in organisational design and governance, including:

  • Written information and resources on relevant subjects, required skills, roles and responsibilities
  • Training and education
  • Ongoing support.

Develop and facilitate access to orientation, training and resources

Develop and/or facilitate access to comprehensive orientation, training and resources for consumers partnering with the organisation.

Strategies may include:

Determine which consumers will gain the most benefit from participating in orientation and training. Training may be more applicable for consumers who are involved in formal partnerships with the organisation, such as members of boards or committees. It may not be feasible or appropriate to provide training for consumers who are involved in more informal partnerships, such as waiting room discussions or consultation processes.

Consider the needs of consumers involved in informal partnerships and ensure that they:

  • Are aware that the information they provide is separate to the process of providing or receiving care, and will not affect their treatment
  • Understand the process in which they are participating and how the information they provide will be used
  • Have an opportunity to provide further comment later if they wish
  • Have an opportunity to raise concerns about the process if they wish.

When looking for ways to support and train consumers and carers, look at similar organisations, speak to state-based consumer healthcare organisations, and think about how existing orientation training and resources could be adapted for consumers and carers.

Day Procedure Services

Provide training and support for consumers involved in the organisation’s governance process, and those who take part in design, measurement or evaluation activities. This gives these consumers the best opportunity to contribute meaningfully and effectively to the organisation. Training can be provided face to face, through take-home resources or through online portals.

Day procedure services may not have the capacity to develop comprehensive training and resources. Instead, look to adapt resources from similar organisations or arrange access to external training programs for consumers partnering with the organisation. Many consumer organisations provide consumer representative training. In addition, the Health Issues Centre has developed Australia’s only accredited consumer representative training course.

Other strategies for orientating and training consumers may include:

  • Providing a tour of the facility, introducing the consumer to key members of the workforce, and explaining the consumer’s role and expectations of their involvement
  • Having a key member of the workforce meet with the consumer regularly to touch base and identify any information required or skills that the consumer would like to develop as part of their role.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Policy documents that describe the orientation and ongoing training provided to consumers who have formed partnerships with the health service organisation
  • Calendar of internal and external training that is available to support consumers who take part in the governance, design, measurement and evaluation of the health service organisation
  • Feedback from consumers and consumer representatives on their experience of orientation, support and education for involvement in governance, design, measurement and evaluation.

MPS & Small Hospitals

MPSs or small hospitals that are part of a local health network or private hospital group should adopt or adapt and use the established orientation program for consumers who partner with their organisation.

Small hospitals that are not part of a local health network or private hospital group should develop training and support for consumers who are involved in the organisation’s governance process, and consumers who take part in design, measurement or evaluation activities, by:

  • Adapting written resources from similar organisations
  • Facilitating access to external training programs for consumers who are partnering with the organisation, such as consumer representative training (see Australia’s only accredited consumer representative training course, developed by the Health Issues Centre)
  • Providing a tour of the facility, introducing the consumer to key members of the workforce, and explaining the consumer’s role and expectations
  • Having a key workforce member meet with the consumer regularly to identify any information required or skills that the consumer would like to develop as part of their role.

Reference

  1. Victorian Department of Human Services. Enabling the consumer role on clinical governance: a guide for health services Melbourne: Victorian Department of Human Services; 2004.