Action 2.14

Partnerships in healthcare governance planning, design, measurement and evaluation

Action 2.14 states

The health service organisation works in partnership with consumers to incorporate their views and experiences into training and education for the workforce

Intent

The workforce has an understanding of health care from the consumer’s perspective, and the value that consumers can bring to organisational design and governance.

Reflective question

How are consumers involved in the design and delivery of workforce training and education?

Key tasks

  • Implement a policy that involves consumers in the design and delivery of workforce training
  • Consult regularly with consumers to seek their views and input for the development and delivery of workforce training.

Strategies for improvement

Hospitals

Develop or adapt policies or processes on workforce training to include consumer involvement

Consider the current processes for training and identify whether they can be used or modified to address this action. Strategies to involve consumers in the development of training could include1, 2:

  • Involving consumers in committees or advisory groups tasked with developing or reviewing training materials and resources
  • Informally talking with consumers and carers in waiting areas about what they would include in person-centred care and partnership training for the clinical workforce
  • Convening focus groups or workshops to seek consumers’ advice on critical information, resources and strategies for training the clinical workforce in person-centred care and partnerships
  • Approaching community groups or local consumer organisations to provide feedback and input into the development of training materials and resources
  • Inviting consumers and carers to attend and review training sessions to ensure that the training reflects their needs and perspectives.

Involve consumers in the delivery of training on person-centred care, partnerships and consumer perspectives

Patient stories can provide a unique perspective of the consumer experience of the health service organisation. More so than other forms of research, patient stories can give a whole-of-system overview, highlighting what matters most to service users.3

Strategies to use patient stories may include:

  • Inviting consumers or carers to present on their experiences
  • Using video or audio recordings of personal stories from consumers or carers
  • Undertaking exercises in which members of the workforce ‘live in the patient’s shoes’ to gain an understanding of the experience of consumers (see Patient-Centered Care Improvement Guide).

Manage consumer information

When involving consumers in the planning, delivery or review of workforce training, document the strategies used and the information collected from consumers in reports, diary entries, meeting agendas or minutes, or other equivalent records.

If consumer or carer stories are used in training, ensure that this information is treated sensitively, that privacy and confidentiality are maintained, and that consumers or carers are supported to share their experiences and stories to the extent that they are comfortable.

Day Procedure Services

Develop or adapt policy or processes on workforce training to include consumer involvement

Day procedure services may use an external provider to provide training about partnerships with consumers. If this is the case, try to use a provider that involves consumers.

If training to the workforce is delivered locally, services can:

  • Invite consumers or local consumer organisations to speak to members of the workforce
  • Talk to patients and carers in waiting areas about what they think is important to include in training about partnerships for the clinical workforce
  • Hold workshops or focus groups with consumers to seek their advice on key information, resources and strategies for training the clinical workforce in partnerships
  • Invite consumers to attend and review training sessions to ensure that the training reflects their needs and perspectives.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Project plans, communication strategies or consultation plans that describe the involvement of consumers in the development of training curriculums and materials
  • Committee and meeting records in which training curriculums for the workforce were discussed and feedback was provided by consumers
  • Training documents that incorporate consumers’ views and experiences
  • Records of training or presentations provided to the workforce by consumers
  • Feedback from consumers involved in developing training and education resources for the workforce.

MPS & Small Hospitals

MPSs or small hospitals that are part of a local health network or private hospital group should adopt or adapt and use the established programs and resources that incorporate the views and experiences of consumers into training.

Small hospitals that are not part of a local health network or private hospital group should develop mechanisms to incorporate the views and experiences of consumers into training by:

  • Informally talking with consumers and carers in waiting areas about what they would include in person-centred care and partnership training for the clinical workforce
  • Convening focus groups or workshops to seek consumers’ advice on critical information, resources and strategies for training the clinical workforce in person-centred care and partnerships
  • Inviting consumers and carers to attend and review training sessions to ensure that the training reflects their needs and perspectives2, 4
  • Inviting consumers or the local consumer organisation to speak to the workforce and share patient stories.

Hospitals

Develop or adapt policies or processes on workforce training to include consumer involvement

Consider the current processes for training and identify whether they can be used or modified to address this action. Strategies to involve consumers in the development of training could include1, 2:

  • Involving consumers in committees or advisory groups tasked with developing or reviewing training materials and resources
  • Informally talking with consumers and carers in waiting areas about what they would include in person-centred care and partnership training for the clinical workforce
  • Convening focus groups or workshops to seek consumers’ advice on critical information, resources and strategies for training the clinical workforce in person-centred care and partnerships
  • Approaching community groups or local consumer organisations to provide feedback and input into the development of training materials and resources
  • Inviting consumers and carers to attend and review training sessions to ensure that the training reflects their needs and perspectives.

Involve consumers in the delivery of training on person-centred care, partnerships and consumer perspectives

Patient stories can provide a unique perspective of the consumer experience of the health service organisation. More so than other forms of research, patient stories can give a whole-of-system overview, highlighting what matters most to service users.3

Strategies to use patient stories may include:

  • Inviting consumers or carers to present on their experiences
  • Using video or audio recordings of personal stories from consumers or carers
  • Undertaking exercises in which members of the workforce ‘live in the patient’s shoes’ to gain an understanding of the experience of consumers (see Patient-Centered Care Improvement Guide).

Manage consumer information

When involving consumers in the planning, delivery or review of workforce training, document the strategies used and the information collected from consumers in reports, diary entries, meeting agendas or minutes, or other equivalent records.

If consumer or carer stories are used in training, ensure that this information is treated sensitively, that privacy and confidentiality are maintained, and that consumers or carers are supported to share their experiences and stories to the extent that they are comfortable.

Day Procedure Services

Develop or adapt policy or processes on workforce training to include consumer involvement

Day procedure services may use an external provider to provide training about partnerships with consumers. If this is the case, try to use a provider that involves consumers.

If training to the workforce is delivered locally, services can:

  • Invite consumers or local consumer organisations to speak to members of the workforce
  • Talk to patients and carers in waiting areas about what they think is important to include in training about partnerships for the clinical workforce
  • Hold workshops or focus groups with consumers to seek their advice on key information, resources and strategies for training the clinical workforce in partnerships
  • Invite consumers to attend and review training sessions to ensure that the training reflects their needs and perspectives.

Examples of evidence

Select only examples currently in use:

  • Project plans, communication strategies or consultation plans that describe the involvement of consumers in the development of training curriculums and materials
  • Committee and meeting records in which training curriculums for the workforce were discussed and feedback was provided by consumers
  • Training documents that incorporate consumers’ views and experiences
  • Records of training or presentations provided to the workforce by consumers
  • Feedback from consumers involved in developing training and education resources for the workforce.

MPS & Small Hospitals

MPSs or small hospitals that are part of a local health network or private hospital group should adopt or adapt and use the established programs and resources that incorporate the views and experiences of consumers into training.

Small hospitals that are not part of a local health network or private hospital group should develop mechanisms to incorporate the views and experiences of consumers into training by:

  • Informally talking with consumers and carers in waiting areas about what they would include in person-centred care and partnership training for the clinical workforce
  • Convening focus groups or workshops to seek consumers’ advice on critical information, resources and strategies for training the clinical workforce in person-centred care and partnerships
  • Inviting consumers and carers to attend and review training sessions to ensure that the training reflects their needs and perspectives2, 4
  • Inviting consumers or the local consumer organisation to speak to the workforce and share patient stories.

References

  1. Health Issues Centre. Accredited training. Melbourne: Health Issues Centre; 2016 [cited 2016 Mar 15].
  2. Victorian Department of Environment and Primary Industries. The engagement toolkit – version 4. Melbourne: DEPI; 2014.
  3. Consumers Health Forum of Australia. Capturing, analysing and using consumers’ health experience narratives to drive better health outcomes. Canberra: CHF; 2013.
  4. Health Issues Centre. Course in consumer leadership. Melbourne: Health Issues Centre; 2017 [cited 2017 Oct 23].