Action 1.4: Implementing and monitoring targeted strategies

Under direction of the governing body, the health service organisation ensures that the agreed priorities to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health are implemented.

What does this mean for the health service organisation?

Under direction of the governing body, the health service organisation ensures that the agreed priorities to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health are implemented. This includes allocating resources; developing, collecting and analysing indicators; monitoring progress and reporting against targets; and evaluating the effectiveness of the systems that are being used.

The spread of improvements and degree of change will be greater if Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities and organisations are involved in the development of strategies and implementing change.

What are the benefits of taking action?

Benefits for the health service organisation include:

  • A coordinated response to improving the safety and quality of care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Improved safety and quality outcomes of the health service organisation
  • Agreed local response to national, and state or territory Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander priorities, policies and strategies
  • Reduction in unsafe practice.

Benefits for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community include:

  • Evidence of commitment to addressing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health priorities
  • Improved care and experiences
  • Improved relationships with the health service organisation
  • Improved health outcomes and equality.19

Key tasks

  • Collaborate with managers and clinicians, together with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clinicians and community representatives, to design and implement improvement strategies in priority areas
  • Routinely monitor, report and evaluate processes, targets and measures of success against the priorities set by the governing body.

Suggested strategies

Examples of supporting evidence

  • Policies, procedures or protocols that incorporate the safety and quality priorities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  • Templates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health impact statements, or examples of these impact statements being used to develop or revise policies or major projects
  • Reports of performance against indicators for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes and employment targets provided to the executive, governing body, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community
  • Documents from committees and other meetings in which the safety and quality priorities and strategies for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are discussed
  • Documentation of strategies implemented to meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people – for example, annual reports, newspaper articles, publications and newsletters.

References

19. Marmot M, Friel S, Bell R, Houweling TAJ, Taylor S. Closing the gap in a generation: health equity through action on the social determinants of health. Lancet 2008;372:1661–9.

21. National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation. Constitution for the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation. Canberra: NACCHO; 2011 (accessed Mar 2017).

7. Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2017: report. Canberra: AHMAC; 2017.

1. National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Standing Committee of the Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council. Cultural respect framework 2016–2026 for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health. Canberra: AHMAC; 2016.

28. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Performance Framework 2014 report: Western Australia. Canberra: AIHW; 2015 (accessed Mar 2017).

29. Renhard R, Willis J, Wilson G, Clarke A, Chong A. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Quality Improvement Framework and Toolkit for Hospital Staff (AQIFTHS). Melbourne: St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne; 2015.